October 6, 2022

Doctors want right to refuse patients: study

The next generation of British doctors believe it should have the right to refuse to treat certain patients based on personal, moral and religious beliefs.
The next
generation of British doctors believe it should have the right to refuse to
treat certain patients based on personal, moral and religious beliefs. A survey
of over 700 medical students found almost half felt they should be entitled to
conscientiously object to carrying out procedures such
as abortions
and treating patients who are drunk or on drugs. Most
of their objections were based on non-religious reasons, but about 20% of
students mentioned religion as the key factor.

Out of the
10 different religious groups to which the students belonged, Muslims were the
most likely to believe they had a right to conscientious objection. In the
anonymous survey, medical students from 4 different universities in Britain
were presented with 11 procedures including abortions, prescribing the pill,
treating patients high on drugs or alcohol and intimate examinations of
patients of the opposite sex.

Asked if
they thought doctors should be entitled to object to any procedure with which
they disagreed on moral, cultural or religious grounds, 45.2% agreed, 40.6%
disagreed and 14.2% were unsure. Of all the objections raised, 44.1% were for
non-religious reasons, 19.7% were based on religion, and 36.2% were both. About
10% objected to treating a patient who was drunk or high on drugs, while 5.4%
preferred not to carry out an intimate examination of a patient of the opposite
sex. ~ The Australian,
July 19

Doctors want right to refuse patients: study
Jared Yee
conscience
conscientious objection